SAA 83rd Annual Meeting

To register for the 83rd Annual Meeting, please sign in or create an a new account using the fields on the right. Then click the "Register Myself" button. Once you have clicked the "Register Myself" button, you will be able to add tours and workshops to your itinerary. 

After you have selected all the events that you would like to participate in, please scroll to the bottom of the page and click "Proceed to Checkout" to finish the registration process.
When
4/11/2018 12:00 PM - 4/15/2018 12:00 PM
Where
Washington Marriott Wardman Park 2660 Woodley Rd NW Washington, DC 20008

Program

   

Wednesday, 11 April 2018

 
SAA will produce an 83rd Annual Meeting attendee list on the meeting mobile app. Please click the 'Add' button if you would like your name excluded from the attendee list. No contact information will be provided, only your name.
Time
4/11/2018 12:00 PM - 4/15/2018 12:00 PM
12:00 PM
Guest registration is for immediate family members who are non-archaeologists and who are at the Annual Meeting as guests of meeting registrants. Guests ages 13 and older are required to display a guest badge for entry to the meeting venue. Each guest registration costs $25. Guest registration may be completed through advance registration or if done on site, registered attendee must accompany guest to registration.
Time
4/11/2018 12:00 PM - 4/15/2018 12:00 PM
12:00 PM
Time
4/11/2018 12:00 PM - 4/15/2018 12:00 PM
12:00 PM
Workshop
Instructors: Francis P. McManamon and Leigh Anne Ellison

Modern archaeological investigations both produce and rely upon digital data: photographs taken in the field, GIS information, analytical and descriptive data sets, project reports, etc. These new data add to an existing, underutilized backlog of archaeological information, much of it in digital formats. Without a well thought-out approach to data management, important information will be overlooked or lost because it is forgotten, misplaced, or damaged. Good digital data management requires attention to the means of data storage, aspects of archiving data, how data are to be preserved, and the curation of data so that it is discoverable, accessible, and usable. This workshop presents ways of managing digital data; ways to organize files economically and effectively; and tools and methods for integrating digital data management practice into academic research and CRM project procedures. Participants are introduced to the types of digital data and information repositories that are available. Archaeologists, whether they work in CRM, for government agencies, or in academic positions, should use digital repositories to store, organize, and promote the results of their work. The workshop presents illustrative case studies from tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record). Participants are shown how to access and use resources in repositories and how to curate and manage CRM reports, data sets, photographs, geospatial files, and other archaeologically relevant digital resources. Participants should bring a laptop computer with wireless capability and a digital file (such as a report, dissertation, small set of images, data set, etc.) to upload to tDAR during the hands-on portion of the workshop. As part of the workshop cost, participants will receive a copy of Caring for Digital Data in Archaeology: A Guide to Good Practice.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Archaeological materials consisting of plant and animal fibers have unique needs once excavated and housed for future research. The Perishable Fibers study tour offers participants an opportunity to visit the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Cultural Resources Center, and explore selected archaeological textiles and basketry from the Andes, and the American Southwest and Southeast. These collections will be the focal point for a discussion of old and new housing methodologies and materials, as well as sampling methods for a variety of analytical techniques. This two-hour study tour will be hosted in the Curatorial Study Room and led by the NMAI's Conservation Department. Participants will leave with a digital (or hard copy) information packet with a complete list of archival storage materials used at NMAI, helpful websites with free downloads, and a flow chart describing nondestructive and destructive analytical techniques and sample sizes.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
All student attendees are invited to attend a reception hosted by SAA's Board of Directors and Cambridge University Press, SAA's publishing partner, in cooperation with the SAA Student Affairs Committee. The reception is a great way for students to kick off the meeting. Attendees will have the opportunity to network with other students and connect with SAA's leadership while enjoying wonderful food. Don't forget to pre-register for this free event!
Time
5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
5:30 PM

Thursday, 12 April 2018

 
Located just south of Washington, DC, with a commanding view of the Potomac River, Mount Vernon is the home of George Washington's estate and mansion. Mount Vernon has a world-class archaeological record that spans the Archaic and Woodland periods through the nineteenth century. Come join Mount Vernon's archaeologists for a remarkable behind-the-scenes tour of the estate. Guests will tour Washington's mansion and more than a dozen original outbuildings. The historic core also includes the tomb of George and Martha Washington and a memorial dedicated to the enslaved people who lived and worked on the estate. The tour will also visit the current excavations at the South Grove and Slave Cemetery, and include a visit to the archaeology lab. The tour will continue with a visit inside the mansion and grounds, focusing on how this research has contributed to the public presentation of the site as well as our knowledge of eighteenth-century daily life and landscape design. Attendees will be given time to purchase lunch (not included in the tour price) at the Mount Vernon Inn Restaurant or Food Court Pavilion.
Time
8:30 AM - 3:00 PM
8:30 AM
Almost 30 years ago, repatriation became a fundamental part of American archaeological practice. While the effects of repatriation laws have been paradigm-changing and are widely recognized, the process to repatriation is filled with intricate details that are not well known. This tour is designed for SAA attendees who are looking for a greater understanding of the complexities of repatriation from the perspective of two Smithsonian museums, the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). Participants will travel to the Smithsonian Institution's Museum Support Center (MSC) in Suitland, MD. Participants will view various aspects of NMNH repatriation work, including the presence of ceremonial space for tribes, traditional care for objects, cooperative curation practices, the documentation of archaeology collections, anthropology records research, and the use of the National Anthropological Archives. Objects to be viewed will not be under a current repatriation request unless permitted by the tribe. Other resources for tribal visitors such as the Recovering Voices Program and digitization projects also will be discussed. The staff of the NMAI will present similar parts of their repatriation program, and include a review of consultation practices, records management, and international repatriation. The tour will last approximately two hours. One hour travel time each way is allotted.
Time
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
8:30 AM
Workshop
Instructors: Danilyn Rutherford and John Yellen

Danilyn Rutherford, the new president of the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, will join forces with John Yellen, the program director for archaeology and archaeometry at the National Science Foundation, to offer a workshop designed to help archaeologists navigate the process of getting a grant. They'll describe the various funding opportunities their organizations offer, discuss the review process, and offer helpful tips on how to write a winning proposal. There will be plenty of time for questions. This event will be suitable for graduate students and seasoned scholars alike.
Time
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
3:00 PM

Friday, 13 April 2018

 
Do you ever wonder what goes on behind the scenes at two of the world's largest museums? Here is your chance for a behind-the-scenes tour of either the collections of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), which house a combined total of nearly four million cultural objects. The NMAI tour will focus on archaeological and ethnographic objects, including Lovelock Cave duck decoys, ceramics from Paquimé (Casas Grandes), and stone seats from Manabí Province, Ecuador. Come learn about how staff members care for these materials, work with indigenous communities, provide access to researchers, and communicate the value of these collections to the general public. Each of these tours will last for approximately two hours. Participants must choose to tour either the NMNH Museum Support Center or the NMAI Cultural Resources Center, both of which are located on the same campus in Suitland, MD, just outside of DC. One hour travel time each way is allotted.
Time
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
8:30 AM
Do you ever wonder what goes on behind the scenes at two of the world's largest museums? Here is your chance for a behind-the-scenes tour of either the collections of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), which house a combined total of nearly four million cultural objects. The NMNH tour will showcase archaeological and ethnographic collections, including iconic objects like Spiro Man, Chaco Canyon chocolate pots, and Hawaiian feather capes. Come learn about how staff members care for these materials, work with indigenous communities, provide access to researchers, and communicate the value of these collections to the general public. Each of these tours will last for approximately two hours. Participants must choose to tour either the NMNH Museum Support Center or the NMAI Cultural Resources Center, both of which are located on the same campus in Suitland, MD, just outside of DC. One hour travel time each way is allotted.
Time
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
8:30 AM

Saturday, 14 April 2018

 
Workshop
Instructor: Leigh Anne Ellison

This workshop is provided as part of the new SAA-Center for Digital Antiquity agreement to promote good practices in the curation of digital data. The workshop is designed for retired members, student members, members from countries with discounted rates, and members from Tribal Historic Preservation Offices, all of whom are eligible, as a benefit of SAA membership, for no-cost uploads to tDAR (up to 10 files or a total of 100 MB). The workshop will show how you can integrate good digital curation habits into current research projects to ensure easy access to data and research results long into the future. We will focus on strategies that can be implemented before research begins (including a discussion on how to budget for digital archiving), as well as ways to streamline the archival process for ongoing or completed research projects that lacked a digital archiving strategy at the outset. Finally, this workshop will discuss and illustrate the types of projects and data archived in tDAR to demonstrate how to make the most of your SAA member benefits.
Time
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
9:00 AM

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