SAA 84th Annual Meeting

When
4/10/2019 - 4/14/2019
Where
Albuquerque, NM

Program

   

Wednesday, 10 April 2019

 
I agree to adhere to the SAA anti-harassment policy and understand that my failure to do so may result in my removal from the SAA conference and any future SAA conferences without refund of my registration fee.
Time
4/10/2019 12:00 PM - 4/14/2019 12:00 PM
12:00 PM
SAA will produce an 84th Annual Meeting attendee list on the meeting mobile app. Please click the 'Add' button if you would like your name excluded from the attendee list. No contact information will be provided, only your name.
Time
4/10/2019 12:00 PM - 4/14/2019 12:00 PM
12:00 PM
Guest registration is for immediate family members who are non-archaeologists and who are at the Annual Meeting as guests of meeting registrants. Guests ages 13 and older are required to display a guest badge for entry to the meeting venue. Each guest registration costs $25. Guest registration may be completed through advance registration or if done on site, registered attendee must accompany guest to registration.
Time
4/10/2019 12:00 PM - 4/14/2019 12:00 PM
12:00 PM
Time
4/10/2019 12:00 PM - 4/14/2019 12:00 PM
12:00 PM
Instructors: David S. Whitley and Johannes H.N. Loubser The workshop will provide a practical introduction to the management of rock art sites, oriented towards CRM archaeologists and students, thus covering information that is not otherwise available in academic settings, books, or agency training and guidance. It is intended to provide enough information to allow CRM archaeologists to develop site management plans, and to access more specialized assistance and resources when needed. Our ultimate goal is to improve the way that rock art sites are managed, recognizing that this is most easily achieved by educating individual archaeological practitioners. Workshop Agenda 1) International Heritage Management Principles The ICOMOS Burra Charter, and how it articulates with the NHPA regulations, and NPS and Advisory Council guidelines. 2) Site Management Basics Stakeholder values; visitor, conservation, and reassessment strategies; infrastructure and education approaches. 3) Condition Assessments Individual site assessments; regional/triage approaches. 4) Conservation Basics Maintenance and panel interventions. 5) Case Studies a) Visitor strategies b) Regional/triage assessments c) Graffiti removal
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Instructor: Ben Marwick Recently, serious concerns about the reproducibility and transparency of research have arisen in many scientific disciplines. These concerns reveal a wide gap between scientific practice and ideals, and threaten to erode public support for research. This workshop will provide hands-on training in robust techniques and free tools and services to improve the reproducibility and transparency of archaeological research. We will introduce participants to R Markdown, Git, and data repositories, which have all been essential in recent developments in social and natural sciences. In this workshop, participants will learn how to use R Markdown to write reports and articles that transparently combine text and code. They will become familiar with the Git version control system to track changes to text, code, and data, and to collaborate more efficiently. They will be able to use a data repository, such as the Open Science Framework, to deposit their code and data, and get a DOI to make it openly available to accompany publications and reports. This workshop is well-suited to novices who have never used these tools before. Participants will need to bring a personal laptop (and power supply). Before attending the workshop, please download and install R (for Windows: https:// cran.r-project.org/bin/windows/base/ release.htm, for OSX: https://cran.rproject. org/bin/macosx/R-latest.pkg), RStudio (for Windows and OSX: https:// www.rstudio.com/products/rstudio/ download/#download) and Git (for Windows and OSX: https://git-scm.com/ downloads). All other materials will be provided in the workshop.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
All student attendees are invited to attend a reception hosted by SAA’s Board of Directors and Cambridge University Press, SAA’s publishing partner, in cooperation with the SAA Student Affairs Committee. The reception is a great way for students to kick off the meeting. Attendees will have the opportunity to network with other students and connect with SAA’s leadership while enjoying wonderful food. Don’t forget to pre-register for this free event!
Time
9:00 PM - 10:30 PM
9:00 PM

Thursday, 11 April 2019

 
Your destination today is Acoma Pueblo, known as “Sky City,” located in the spectacular West-Central Plateau of New Mexico. Acoma Pueblo, situated 350 feet above an outstretched valley atop a massive sandstone mesa at 7,000 feet above sea level, is the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in the United States. Archaeologists put the initial occupation of the Pueblo around AD 1150. The first Europeans, led by Francisco Vázquez de Coronado, first visited Acoma in 1540. A Pueblo member will take you on a ¾-mile leisurely guided tour of the village, explaining the culture and history of the tribe. Points of interest include San Estevan del Rey Mission, built in 1629, the largest and most remarkable of all the Spanish Colonial mission churches in New Mexico. All building materials for the church and other structures in the village were carried or hauled great distances by hand up the steep slope of the mesa. The 360-degree views from Acoma are breathtaking and offer many photo opportunities. The tour includes a camera permit, but note that video cameras, digital video cameras, and binoculars are prohibited.
Time
8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
8:00 AM

Friday, 12 April 2019

 
Pecos National Historical Park is located just east of Santa Fe in the beautiful Sangre de Cristo Mountains. It encompasses thousands of acres of landscape infused with historical elements, from prehistoric archaeological ruins to 19th-century ranches, the remnants of an old Spanish church, and beautiful landscapes. Its largest single feature is Pecos Pueblo, a Native American community abandoned in historic times. First a state monument in 1935, it was made Pecos National Monument in 1965, and greatly enlarged and renamed in 1990. Two sites within the park, the pueblo and the Glorieta Pass Battlefield are National Historic Landmarks. Here you will travel back in time to the once-populated Pecos Pueblo and take a walking tour of the ancestral sights.
Time
7:00 AM - 1:00 PM
7:00 AM
Instructors: Kristen Barnett and Lauren Sieg This workshop will be the inaugural session of an annual workshop organized around the theme of repatriation. It is intended to establish equitable collaborative partnerships between the SAA and local Tribal communities associated with the locale of our annual meeting. This year the workshop will be based on repatriation concerns, broadly considered, in the Southwest region. The specific topics for the workshop will be structured by responses to an independent survey of local Tribal Historic Preservation Officers or Tribal NAGPRA representatives, museum professionals, federal representatives, universities, professional archaeological societies, and CRM firms. The survey is aimed at identifying local concerns, barriers, and challenges to repatriation. Survey results will provide a baseline for small and large group discussions focused on realizing a multitude of challenges from various experiences and problem-solving as a collaborative effort. We will also reflect on how we currently situate ourselves in relation to the results of the survey and reevaluate our goals as a concerned and invested SAA.
Time
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
2:00 PM

Saturday, 13 April 2019

 
Petroglyph National Monument stretches 17 miles along Albuquerque’s West Mesa, a volcanic basalt escarpment that dominates the city’s western horizon. This unique site protects a variety of cultural and natural resources, including five volcanic cones, hundreds of archeological sites, and an estimated 25,000 images that have been pecked, chiseled, or carved into the volcanic rock surface by native peoples and early Spanish settlers. Many of the images are recognizable as animals, people, brands, and crosses; others are more complex. Their meaning, possibly understood only by the carver, is inseparable from the greater cultural landscape and from the spirits of the people who created them. These people, who lived along the Rio Grande River for many centuries, come alive again through these images carved on the shiny black rocks and provide glimpses into a 12,000-yearlong story of human life in the area.
Time
8:00 AM - 12:30 PM
8:00 AM
Instructors: Leigh Anne Ellison and Rachel Fernandez This workshop is provided as part of the current SAA•Center for Digital Antiquity agreement to promote good digital curation and data management practices. The workshop is designed for retired members, student members, members from countries with discounted rates, and members from Tribal Historic Preservation Offices. SAA members in these categories are eligible, as a benefit of SAA membership, for no-cost uploads to tDAR (annually up to 10 files or a total of 100 MB). The workshop will show how you can integrate good digital curation habits into current or past research projects to ensure easy access to data and research results long into the future. We will focus on strategies that can be implemented before research begins (including a discussion on how to budget for digital archiving), as well as ways to streamline the archival process for ongoing or completed research projects that lacked a digital archiving strategy at the outset. Finally, this workshop will discuss and illustrate the types of projects and data archived in tDAR to demonstrate how to make the most of your SAA member benefits.
Time
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
9:00 AM
Head to Bandelier National Monument, which is best known for its mesas, sheer-walled canyons and the ancestral Pueblo dwellings found among them. This fascinating archaeological site, situated at 7,000 feet above sea level, encompasses over 32,000 acres of wilderness crisscrossed by 60 miles of maintained trails. The Park was designated in 1916 and named for nineteenthcentury archaeologist Adolph Bandelier. Frijoles Canyon is famous for its extensive Ancestral Pueblo People ruins and cliff dwellings that date back to approximately AD 1100. The Ancestral Pueblo People farmed this canyon for over 400 years and lived in multi-storied stone and mud structures or in caves carved out of the volcanic cliffs. Here, you will enjoy climbing the ladders into the caves and kivas. Boxed lunches will be provided.
Time
10:30 AM - 4:30 PM
10:30 AM

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